PCT Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

When one decides to go on a journey such as the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) a lot of questions tend to arise from their friends and family. We’ve gathered a few of those questions from our loved ones in this article and hope to answer them to the best of our ability.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):

1. How will you get food? Will you have an opportunity to bathe or shower?

We are buying much of our food supply before leaving. Most of the food stuffs will be in the form of freeze dried meals and supplemented with energy bars (mostly ClifBars) and trail mix. This allows us to pack our supply boxes before hand so that our families can simply drop them off at the post office when they are supposed to go out. We will have opportunities to shower periodically on the trail. There are towns roughly every 5 to 7 days on the PCT and many have a hotel or mountain resort or trail angel or camp that we will be able to grab a shower at.

2. How is everybody feeling about the journey as it draws closer to your departure date?

Everyone is excited to get going, we are currently putting the finishing touches on our supply packages but other than that we are all at a point where we are ready to hit the trail and get on with the fun!

3. The team will be packing a small first aid kit. Do you have an emergency plan in case a team member needs medical care?

Yes, the team will be carrying first aid kits for each member and should a member need medical attention in the field all the members of the team have had some CPR or basic first aid training in the past so we should be able to manage a sling or other first aid technique should that unfortunate event occur.

4. With the understanding that you will have cell phones. How will you be able to charge them? Do you have concerns about communicating with each other and your support team?

Jon will be carrying a GoalZero Switch 8 and Nomad 7 charging kit that will allow the team to charge their phones as we go. Because we hope to be able to blog along the way it is important that we can use some of the sun’s energy to be able to have our phones up and running at the day’s end so we can post that day’s experience. As for the communication aspect of this question, we’ll be able contact our family and friends and support members through our regular phones when there is enough service. When this cell service is missing we’ll need to use the satellite locator beacon and communicator that Gary will be carrying. This will allow us to contact people through satellite connections when cell services aren’t available.

5. Has the team had training or experience with face-to-face encounters with bears or other wild animals?

The majority of the crew have extensive hiking experience and Lora has worked as an intern under the National Park Service and has training in animal encounters and what to do in these situations. The animals we may encounter range from Mountain Lions and Bears, but will more likely be Snakes and Bugs.

6. Have you heard of the Book/Movie Wild?

Yes, we are aware of the book and movie. It was, in no way, any inspiration for the members that are hiking the trail this year. Gary and Jon both read about half the book before we decided we couldn’t take it anymore due to all her ill preparedness and poor decision making. Lora, I believe has read the whole book. All of us have seen the movie. I think we are all in agreement that the book Wild by Cheryl Strayed and the subsequent movie with Reese Witherspoon are about a story that is a self discovery story that includes the Pacific Crest Trail and not a Pacific Crest Trail story that includes some self discovery.

7. Do you think you will see many hikers on the trail?

We will likely see a good number of hikers on the trail this year. The increased popularity of the book/movie Wild have also boosted the number of people interested in the PCT this year. At last count, we estimated from the PCTA.org permit system that they had issued over 2100 long distance northbound permits for the 2015 year. That’s a lot of long distance hikers and doesn’t even include the people that will be hiking in sections that don’t require a long distance permit. We will also be attending the Annual Day Zero Pacific Crest Trail Kick Off (ADZPCTKO) where we will see many of these hikers as well as those who have hiked the trail in previous years and our friends and family.

8. How long do you think your beards and hair will get? Will you be trimming either along the way?

The answer to something like this depends on the individual hiker. Gary has expressed some interest in being able to shave periodically during the 5 month long hike while Jon has said that he’ll probably go without a hair cut or a shave for the duration unless the hair or beard becomes some sort of annoyance. Really, it just depends on the comfort and preference of the hiker.

9. Will you have some sort of health log? Will the team do a weigh-in and weigh-out?

We are not currently planning on chronicling our weight for the journey as this is more than just a workout regiment. There will likely be some discussion of noticeable health changes as the journey progresses but we aren’t making it a priority topic for discussion.

10. How do you plan to spend your time on off days? games? journal? etc.?

Many of our off days have been planned for areas where we will be able to spend time with our families so the majority of those times will be spent catching up with loved ones. When we have down time on the trail such as evenings at camp we will have a few activities to enjoy. Many of us will be carrying a book while hiking. Jon will also be carrying a travel sized version of Backgammon and we’ll probably have a deck of cards on hand as well.

That covers the most common questions we’ve been getting from our family and friends. If you have more questions you’d like us to answer feel free to post them in the comments or use our contact us page!

NorCal Mom Cheering From The Sidelines

Hello, from Northern California. Situated along the Siskiyou Trail, Redding was a trade and travel route connecting California’s Central Valley and the Pacific Northwest. My name is Wendy Adams and I am Jon Adams’ mother. When Jon was a young boy he loved the Ninja Turtles, basketball and playing video games. Our family weekends were filled with athletic events, juggling between softball, volleyball, and basketball tournaments. Back then if you were to tell me that this young man would grow up to be a college scholar, world traveler, and one of the founding members of the San Diego PCT Sloggers I guess my response would have been to quote one of my favorite people…

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says ‘I’m possible’! ― Audrey Hepburn.

And it is with this philosophy that my husband and I embrace the SD Sloggers 2015 adventure.  The one thing that I know how to do well is to cheer on the team from the sidelines. This NorCal mom is going to be the best darn cheerleader the Sloggers have ever seen.

Am I nervous or worried about the SD PCT Sloggers going on the trip?
Of course, a little. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t. I was always nervous watching my kids playing the sports they loved. I take comfort knowing that they are traveling as a team and that Gary Funk is an experienced PCT journeyman. There is always some level of risks involved and at the end of the day the rewards far outweigh those risks.

What am I doing to prepare for their Journey?  My training starts now, beginning with a task list.

  • Educational training, learn at least one fact a day. I am a little embarrassed to admit this, but I honestly did not know about the Pacific Crest Trail until Jon started talking about his dream to slog it.
  • Ask questions! This task has already been underway as Jon can attest to. I know the team has done their research and the more I know about their plan the more assurance I have that they are well prepared.
  • Study the itinerary and create a map so that I can visually see their progress.
  • On a personal note, I am committing to a healthier lifestyle. My husband and I have plans to camp with the group when they are in our region. It just makes sense to me that choosing to eat a healthy diet and commit to being more physically active is a great way to show my support from the sidelines.
    Create a master calendar and try to stay organized. While the team is traveling there will be a lot of activities here at home. We have a family wedding the first of May, for example. Prepare to be flexible and ready to switch gears or plans at moments notice.
  • Cheer them on!  Using Facebook and Twitter will be a great use of social media to share with family, friends and fans.
  • And lastly I will be there with my pompoms and noise makers when we gather to celebrate their successful journey home!

TRAINING HIKES: Local Trails Used for Training for the Pacific Crest Trail

When preparing for a long distance hike, such as the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), it’s important to make sure you are in the best possible shape prior to setting out. This will decrease the risk of injury as you start making your way through the trail and increase the mileage you can do right from the get go. It is for that reason the Sloggers have a list of hikes that we like to do during the week that don’t even require leaving the city. San Diego, like many great large metropolitan areas, has saved some land for the city dwellers to be able to get outside and on a trail and get a good workout with just a short drive within the city limits.

This is, by no means, a full list of the hikes that our group likes to hike in town but this post will cover two of the longer local hikes that have some elevation gain/loss and are a great way for us to keep our butts in gear. Both of these hikes are within an area in San Diego known as Mission Trail Regional Park which is an invaluable space in the city that many people come to to get outside and move around.

The first hike we’ll talk about is what we call the Fortuna Double. There are two peaks within Mission Trail Regional Park called North Fortuna and South Fortuna. There are multiple ways to get to each peak but our usual way of reaching the peaks is to traverse the saddle between them and then go up to one peak and double back to the other and then head back down the saddle. The saddle is what makes these peaks a good workout as the first mile and a half from the parking lot is mostly flat and skirts the Mission Dam and San Diego River that flows through the area. Then you come to the saddle where you’ll climb upward on a service road for about half a mile. Once you’ve made it up to the top of the saddle you’ll catch your breath and pick a peak, either North Fortuna (to your right) or South Fortuna (to your left). Personally, I prefer to do North Fortuna first but it really doesn’t matter which order you tackle them in.

View West From North Fortuna, a Favorite Training Hike for the PCT. (Click Image for Larger View.)
View West From North Fortuna, a Favorite Training Hike for the PCT. (Click Image for Larger View.)

Once you’ve bagged both peaks you’ll head back down the saddle in the direction you came and retrace your steps back past the dam and to the parking lot. Here are the stats for this hike:

Stats for North and South Fortuna Hike from the Parking Lot on Father Junipero Serra Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Stats for North and South Fortuna Hike from the Parking Lot on Father Junipero Serra Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)

The other hike I’ll describe in this post is on the other side of Mission Trail Regional Park and includes the highest peak within the park, Cowles Mountain, which is a great training hike on its own. However, this hike continues on from the peak of Cowles Mountain to a second peak known as Pyles Peak. There are multiple trails to the top of Cowles Mountain but only one trail from the peak there over to Pyles Peak. My preferred route up Cowles is to park on the street at the intersection of Prostpect Avenue and Mesa Road. There is a park, just on the other side of a fence, known as Big Rock Park which is what most people would know this area as. From Big Rock Park you’ll follow the trail as it climbs and dips at times making its way up to the Cowles Mountain service road after about a mile and a half from the park. Once you reach the service road, you’ll follow that to the peak of Cowles Mountain, which becomes fairly steep towards the top where you’ll get the most challege in this workout.

View of Cowles Mountain (the Peak with the Radio Tower) from South Fortuna. (Click Image for Larger View.)
View of Cowles Mountain (the Peak with the Radio Tower) from South Fortuna. (Click Image for Larger View.)

Once at the peak of Cowles Mountain, you’ll continue straight ahead where you will find the trail sign marking the trail over to Pyles Peak. From here, the trail descends down a bit skirting the ride line of a couple smaller mounds and then begins the ascent towards your next destination. You’ll come to a bit of a fork in the trail after maybe two-thirds of a mile. At this fork you can either go off to the right and scramble up the back side of Pyles Peak where some small trails give way to some light rock scrambling (this is the less traveled but sometimes more fun and probably more challenging path) or you can continue on the main trail to the left which descends slightly and takes you around to the ‘front’ side of Pyles Peak where the trail leads you up to the top. To get back to your car you’ll retrace your steps back to Cowles Mountain and eventually back to Big Rock Park. Here are the stats for my last hike of Pyles Peak from Big Rock Park:

Pyles Peak Via Cowles Mountain from Big Rock Park is a Favorite Local Hike to Train for the Pacific Crest Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Pyles Peak Via Cowles Mountain from Big Rock Park is a Favorite Local Hike to Train for the Pacific Crest Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)