Packaging Parties! The Process of Filling Out Your Resupply Packages.

As we draw ever closer to our Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) departure date it becomes increasingly important to make sure that all of our trail ducks are falling into their places in line. One of the most important ducks is the supply packages that will serve as our lifeline as we make our way from Mexico to Canada over the next few months. There are many ways to organize your packages and really there is no ‘correct way’ to do it other than to go with the method that makes sense to you (and whoever is going to be mailing your packages for you while on the trail). Jon and Gary have been doing a lot of their packaging together in the great room at Gary and Sandy’s house. We’ve been filling boxes, rolling toilet paper rolls into half rolls, filling bags of trail mix and rationing out meals to make it from stop to stop and town to town. The method that we chose to use in order to keep everything in line was to lay out all our boxes (predominantly flat rate boxes from the United States Postal Service) marked for each of our mail drops and support crew delivery spots. This allowed us to visualize the trip in a way and to then divide our meals into each box based on how many days it takes to get from one spot to the next.

Jon's Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) Supply Boxes All Lined Up. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Jon’s Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) Supply Boxes All Lined Up. (Click Image for Larger View.)

There are more things to pack than just food though. We also needed to divvy out toiletries such as travel sized toothpastes and toothbrushes, fuel canisters for our resupply spots that are hand deliveries (can’t ship the fuel cans), Halfmile maps, toilet paper and the like. Toilet paper provides a bit of ‘fun’ during the packing process as we ‘got to’ roll out half rolls of TP to put in each box because a whole roll would be overkill to carry at any one time and the half rolls save shipping space which becomes a premium in the spots where it is a bit longer from one city to the next.

Sandy, Marissa and Jon Rolling Out Half Rolls of TP for the PCT. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Sandy, Marissa and Jon Rolling Out Half Rolls of TP for the PCT. (Click Image for Larger View.)

We are coming down to the wire with our leave date set for April 1, 2015 but after our packaging parties we’re just about ready to get rolling (or slogging, rather)! We’ll be printing shipping labels with addresses for each spot, setting aside our sierra gear for Kennedy Meadows, and putting our last finishing touches on our boxes over the next week or so. We’re so close we can smell ourselves on the trail (ewwww)!

Jon's PCT Gear Rests Under the Packing Pool Table Used to Roll TP Half Rolls and Bag Out Trail Mix. Gary's Supply Boxes line the background. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Jon’s PCT Gear Rests Under the Packing Pool Table Used to Roll TP Half Rolls and Bag Out Trail Mix. Gary’s Supply Boxes line the background. (Click Image for Larger View.)

TRAINING HIKE: Barrel Springs to Warner Springs

Those of you who have been reading this blog from the beginning or have looked through our backlog, you may have noticed that Jon and Marissa did a similar hike as an overnight back in November. The main differences of this hike to that earlier one are that Marissa was off at work so this hike included the group of Gary, Lora and Jon; the time of year was much different making the terrain and weather different as well. The other difference was that the group wasn’t going north of Warner Springs to camp as we were being picked up in Warner Springs from Sandy (Gary’s wife and part of our future support team). We also detoured (very slightly) from the Pacific Crest Trail to take a break on the back side of Eagle Rock and you can definitely see why this rock formation gets its name from the back side.

The View of Eagle Rock from the Side Opposite the Pacific Crest Trail Where You Can See Why it Gets its Name. (Click for Larger View.)
The View of Eagle Rock from the Side Opposite the Pacific Crest Trail Where You Can See Why it Gets its Name. (Click for Larger View.)

The group parked a car along the S22, also known as Montezuma Grade, and picked up the Pacific Crest Trail heading north. I won’t rehash the details of the hike as you can skip back to that previous post for Marissa and Jon’s overnight hike. I mainly wanted to discuss the differences in the time of year in this section as that was what struck me. I had someone mention to me about that earlier post that it was nice to see what the trail looked like in a certain section but with changes of the season so to come changes on the trail. The terrain in this area was far greener than it was for that earlier hike. The trail was no longer surrounded by brown and yellow rolling hills with spots of Coyote Gourds and replaced with the greenest of pastures dotted with cows (and frequented with cow pies).

View of Cows Taken from the Pacific Crest Trail (Left) and the Rolling Green Hills of February on the PCT (Right). (Click Image for Larger View.)
View of Cows Taken from the Pacific Crest Trail (Left) and the Rolling Green Hills of February on the PCT (Right). (Click Image for Larger View.)

The crew for this hike also brought their packs along with them as they did for the previous hike from Burnt Rancheria Campground to Kwaaymii Point and Jon even increased his pack weight from about twenty pounds up to thirty pounds. The weather was perfect for this hike also, the first hike in this section from Jon and Marissa was a very windy day in which they stopped at Eagle Rock merely to hide behind some rocks for a while to get a break from the gusts. This hike was far calmer and easier for it.

Map, Distance, and Time Stats for Barrel Springs to Warner Springs Hike.
Map, Distance, and Time Stats for Barrel Springs to Warner Springs Hike.
Elevation Stats for Barrel Springs to Warner Springs Hike.
Elevation Stats for Barrel Springs to Warner Springs Hike.

TRAINING HIKE: Barrel Springs to Agua Caliente Creek Camp Overnight!

As mentioned in a previous training hike post, Marissa and I (Jon) were planning on doing an overnight hike/camp trip to the trail camp that is roughly 4 miles north of Warner Springs along the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). This is the account of that overnight hike.

To get to the Barrel Springs entry point on the PCT we parked along Montezuma Valley Road (S22) at the 1 mile marker. There was a pretty well defined dirt pullout on the south side of the road with good shade cover where we parked. From the car we entered onto the PCT by crossing the road (Look both ways! The speed limit is 55 here so cars can come up fast!) and entering through a cattle gate heading north. This part of the trail begins with a slight climb on some looping ridge lines finally bringing you to the top of a chaparral covered ridge. From here you’ll descend through the chaparral and cacti to reach the valley below. Once at the valley, you may feel a bit exposed as the terrain is much more prairie like and contains nearly no overhead growth until you reach the next ridge. The first valley is pretty short, though, and serves as a bit of a prelude to what is to come. After the first valley you’ll traverse another small ridge with more chaparral and cacti before descending again to the next valley floor. The climbs are negligible, as you’ll see in the stats images at the end of this post. The total gain/loss for the entire one-way hike from Barrel Springs to our camp site was only 1040 ft. Once you’re on the second valley floor you’ll head out into the open again with great panoramic views of rolling hills and their accompanied ridge lines on the outskirts. The trail first takes you to some rock formations you can just make out as your start your trek through the meadow. From these first rock formations you’ll follow the trail up a slight ascent and then back down again as it bends west a bit and finally arrives at Eagle Rock. Eagle rock is another grouping of rock formations right around the 5 mile mark.

A main challenge in this open space, at least on the days we were coming through in mid-November, was wind. The wind coming through the valleys can be pretty brutal if you don’t have some sort of wind protection. I was wearing a long sleeve dryfit shirt to protect against the sun and wind and my hat has a chin strap which came in very handy in this area. We took a break at the trail crossing to Eagle Rock (you can take a small side trail up to the rocks if you’re nasty) where there were a few decent sized rocks near the trail that we could get a rest from the wind for a few minutes. Click here for a video of the panoramic view from the trail with my AEE MagiCam SD22 (It’s like a GoPro but a fraction of the cost). I replaced the annoying wind flooding the camera’s microphone with a more soothing, yet still fitting, tone.

Eagle Rock between Barrel Springs and Warner Springs
Eagle Rock between Barrel Springs and Warner Springs on the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). Click here for a video of the area.

After leaving Eagle Rock the trail leads you through the final stretch of meadow and then into a shaded area that appears to follow a creek bed, which was dry during our hike. From here, you’ll descend some while enjoying the much more protected area of the shady oaks around you until you finally reach Warner Springs. Before you reach the first crossing of Highway 79 near Warner Springs you can opt to take the California Riding and Hiking Trail into town if you want to grab a bite to eat or need to tend to anything else in a small town before heading to camp. We continued on the Pacific Crest Trail with goes wide to the west of the town. If you continue on the PCT, first you’ll come to the Warner Springs Fire Station where you will have to come up to the road and cross (you can’t go under the bridge even when the creek is dry as there is a barbed wire fence on one side). Once across Highway 79, you’ll follow the trail northwest through some more open meadow lands until you reach some more shady oaks just before the second Highway 79 crossing. Just before crossing the second road we took another little break at what appeared to be an ill maintained campground. It wasn’t pretty but there were picnic tables and a rope swing in the area we set our packs down.

After starting up again you’ll pass by what looks like some fire fighter training grounds with a ropes course and some other structures around. Then you’ll come to the white bridge that you would park near if you were going to start the Agua Caliente Trail hike that was outlined in a previous post. From here, you will follow the PCT northbound as described in that earlier Agua Caliente Trail Hike post.

You can find a short video showing the Agua Caliente Creek trail camp site that we used on the San Diego Sloggers Facebook page. Here area  couple pictures of the area if you’re lazy.

Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp on PCT
Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp on PCT. Click here for a short video showing the whole area.
Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp on PCT.
Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp on PCT. Click here for a short video showing the whole area.

Below are the hike stats from our adventure.

Barrel Springs to Agua Caliente Creek Pace
Our Pace From Barrel Springs to Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp along the PCT.
Barrel Springs to Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp
Our Elevation Gain/Loss From Barrel Springs to Agua Caliente Creek Trail Camp along the PCT.