TRAINING HIKE: Burnt Rancheria Campground to Kwaaymii Point

We are just under two months from our departure date and as we draw closer and closer it becomes more and more important for us to start introducing the weight of a thru-hiker’s pack into our training hikes. It is for this reason that when Gary, Lora and Jon hiked the nearly 13 miles from Burnt Rancheria Campground in the community of Mount Laguna, CA to Kwaaymii Point just off the Sunrise Highway to the north. Along the trail, this section would be the first half of day three which would likely end somewhere around the Mason Valley Truck Trail before the Pacific Crest Trail winds its way around Granite Mountain and to Scissors Crossing on Highway 78.

The conditions for this training hike ended up being a nice test for some new rain gear that some members of the team either had already acquired or were thinking about skipping. Gary had yet to test his new rain jacket and pants from Montbell that he got for Christmas and Jon was hoping to make it through most of the trail without traditional rain pants. The first half of the hike was just on the edge of needing this type of gear as it was mostly just a lite mist in parts. However, that mist eventually gave way to actual rain showers as the day and our hike pushed onward. Jon and Gary also got to test their new pack covers from ULA which worked great and are the lightest things we could find for such use (and much more durable than a hefty bag). As for the other gear tests, Gary’s Montbell rain gear is the lightest we’ve seen and performed very well in the grey misty and rainy conditions. As for Jon not having rain paints, that has actually changed as a result of this hike (as I write this entry about two weeks late). The issue became not really the rain itself but that Jon was wearing regular hiking pants for the day and found that as the day’s weather accumulated on the plants on the trail that the most effected area became below the knees due to dismissing brush on the side of the trail. This is normally an unnoticed occurrence on a dry day but kept depositing the plant’s water onto Jon’s pants which became quite wet and heavy by the end of the hike. This could be avoided by wearing shorts (as Lora did) but that is less comfortable for most or wearing rain pants (Which Jon has since purchased and will carry on the trail).

Gary, Lora, and Jon in the grey conditions on the Pacific Crest Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)
Gary, Lora, and Jon in the grey conditions on the Pacific Crest Trail. (Click Image for Larger View.)

As for the hike itself, the trail in this section is a breeze! Because the hike starts at Burnt Rancheria Campground in Mount Laguna, CA you’re at the highest part of this section. The trail is relatively flat for the first few miles as you make your way north of town before dropping a couple hundred feet at a very steady pace. There is a slight climb as the trail winds along some chaparral lined and rocky ridge lines. After this mild and short climb the trail descends again down to the Pioneer Mail Picnic Area just off the Sunrise Highway. The last .7 or so takes you from the picnic area up to Kwaaymii Point which is a little bit of a climb but is less than a mile and has some memorial plaques and nice views off into the desert on a clear day.

Map, Distance, and Time Stats for Burnt Rancheria to Kwaaymii Point Hike.
Map, Distance, and Time Stats for Burnt Rancheria to Kwaaymii Point Hike.
Elevation Stats for Burnt Rancheria to Kwaaymii Point Hike.
Elevation Stats for Burnt Rancheria to Kwaaymii Point Hike.

8 thoughts on “TRAINING HIKE: Burnt Rancheria Campground to Kwaaymii Point

  1. I completely agree with your need for rain pants statement: “The issue became not really the rain itself but that Jon was wearing regular hiking pants for the day and found that as the day’s weather accumulated on the plants on the trail that the most effected area became below the knees due to dismissing brush on the side of the trail.” This also occurs significantly in the Northern Cascades too. The difference being this moisture is quite chilly in Washington.

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    1. We hike independently when we can during the week and then on Friday (just the day that works for the three main hikers) we do a longer hike like this that is 10-15 miles or so. On the trail we will be shooting for a 20 mile/day average when not in the sierras.

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      1. Yeah, there will definitely be stretches to be able to pick up the pace (Oregon for instance) but the Sierras definitely drop the pace with all the elevation gain/loss.

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